The modern lifestyle simply calls for multitasking. You have to do the laundry as you cook dinner. You have to reply to an important text message as you cross the road. You even have to attend to your private emails as you help your daughter with her homework. Just think about all the things that you get to do one at a time, and it probably will not amount to much. When do you fit in the time to listen to some relaxing music in your busy schedule? In addition, when do you spare those precious but necessary moments to exercise in your jam-packed day? Well, you can always multi-task as they show in those fitness ads. However, not only is it too much for your body to process two separate activities, it is downright dangerous. Here are some reasons why you should never mix the two.

  1. Divided attention

Multitasking calls for divided attention. It is common enough to be distracted by your surroundings and thoughts. However, if you willingly take up two separate activities at a time, both will get divided attention. You won’t really be able to listen to the music, and you won’t really be able to focus on your body exercising correctly. An exercise form like jogging especially calls for more focus. You need to focus on where you are going. Music, on the other hand, has emotive effects. If the music takes up more attention than is practical, and even move you emotionally, you are potentially in a dangerous situation.


  1. Inability to derive maximum effects of jogging

Jogging is a great and simple cardio exercise. Less aggressive than running and more effective than walking, jogging makes for a perfect workout without burning you up. However, by jogging in the great outdoors there are other benefits to be had. You get to smell the fresh air in the morning in an otherwise convoluted city life. You hear natural sounds that are drowned by the din of the city for the rest of the day. Most importantly, you get to clear your mind, have a natural high, and feel fresh and pure. With music blasting through headphones blocking all that out, you end up losing a lot in the process.

  1. Inability to derive maximum effects of listening to music

The only way that music inspires physical expression is dancing. Jogging and music do not mix. Fitness gear and music player endorsements like to recommend such a lifestyle choice of blending the two. However, exercise is supposed to naturally induce feelings of good will and positivity. Even the most positive music cannot induce the same amount of clarity and freshness. The embalming effects of music should be experienced elsewhere.

The worst-case scenario for such a mix is obviously a potentially fatal accident. Even if you do not go jogging outdoors and prefer your treadmill instead, it is still risky. Accidents can happen even at home and treadmill accidents are a reality. Therefore, jogging and listening to music are immensely enjoyable forms of activities that should never be mixed together.

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